Indigenous Legacy Initiatives

LISTEN - LEARN - DO BETTER

We are committed to reconciliation and ensuring that the tragic history and ongoing legacy of residential schools is never forgotten in order to build a better Canada for all of us.

A Guide to First Nations Territory Acknowledgments.

(Prevost Region)

Hello – Tansi – Taanishi – Halu – Kwe’ – Nú – Bonjour!

We would like to acknowledge that the land on which we gather is the traditional unceded territory of the Omàmìwininìwag (Algonquin) and Anishinabewaki ᐊᓂᔑᓈᐯᐗᑭ peoples.

We acknowledge and thank the diverse Indigenous people whose footsteps have marked this territory on which we now gather.”

SEPTEMBER 30th

TEACHING RESOURCES: ABOUT RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS

KIDS NEWS: What is Reconciliation

Teaching the basics about Residential Schools to children!

Namwayut: we are all one. Truth and reconciliation in Canada

THE STORY OF THE ORANGE SHIRT (10:07)

The Orange Shirt Story is a true tale that details the journey of one young Indigenous girl to residential school.

ACTIVITIES & EVENTS

Orange Shirt Day Activity

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ELEMENTARY

(csmith@swlauriersb.qc.ca)

CITIZENSHIP: KNOTTED ORANGE FLAG

Schools working on Truth & Reconciliation initiatives can receive a knotted orange flag from the Spiritual Animation Department.

A visual representation of your commitment to listen, learn, and do better in your school community.

Bring your knotted flag to the SWLSB student leadership SUMMIT and tell all of us your story.

Background: A signal and a promise. The flag is prevented from flying as a mark of humility in light of tragic events and it is a call to action... One day the flag can be made to fly free.

  • Jules Verne Elementary

  • Mountainview High School

djohnson@swlauriersb.qc.ca

COMMUNITY BUILDING


MARCH 2022

Plan to attend the 2022 SWLSB Student Leadership SUMMIT and tell YOUR SCHOOL story about Truth & Reconciliation!

"Our history will not be our future!"

RESOURCES & PROGRAMS

Support for classrooms, ECAs, and schools.

ANKOSÉEVERYTHING IS CONNECTEDTOUT EST RELIÉ

Are you connected? - LEARNING & CITIZENSHIP -

DWF provides access to education on the true history of Indigenous people in Canada and the history and legacy of Residential Schools, and encourages reconciliation by way of our programming and events for schools.

THE SECRET PATH - Story

Gord Downie began Secret Path as ten poems incited by the story of Chanie Wenjack, a twelve year-old boy who died fifty years ago on October 22, 1966, in flight from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School near Kenora, Ontario, walking home to the family he was taken from over 400 miles away. Gord was introduced to Chanie Wenjack (miscalled “Charlie” by his teachers) by Mike Downie, his brother, who shared with him Ian Adams’ Maclean’s story from February 6, 1967, “The Lonely Death of Charlie Wenjack.”

LEARNING

Here you will find many resources to help you bring Fist Nations, Metis and Inuit ('FNMI') themes into both your classroom and your wider learning community.

The Blanket Exercise is based on using Indigenous methodologies and the goal is to build understanding about our shared history as Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada by walking through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. Everyone is actively involved as they step onto blankets that represent the land, and into the role of First Nations, Inuit and later Métis peoples. By engaging on an emotional and intellectual level, the Blanket Exercise effectively educates and increases empathy.

INTRO VIDEO (2:54)

The NCTR is a place of learning and dialogue where the truths of the residential school experience will be honoured and kept safe for future generations.

This project aims to provide elementary and high school–level teachers with curriculum-linked lesson plans designed by contemporary Indigenous artists. The goal is to build students’ cultural competence and respect for diverse Indigenous peoples, while encouraging critical thinking about colonialism in Canada.

INDIGENOUS CANADA is a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) from the Faculty of Native Studies that explores Indigenous histories and contemporary issues in Canada.

From an Indigenous perspective, this course explores key issues facing Indigenous peoples today from a historical and critical perspective highlighting national and local Indigenous-settler relations.

Indigenous Canada is for students from faculties outside the Faculty of Native Studies with an interest in acquiring a basic familiarity with Indigenous/non-Indigenous relationships.

Delve into the National Film Board's vast Indigenous film collection to be inspired, spark discussion and help foster understanding.

Take advantage of all that the NFB has to offer for K-12 by subscribing to CAMPUS.






CITIZENSHIP, ENGAGMENT & ACTION STEPS

Reconcili-ACTION happens one step at the time and each of the #Next150 challenges will give you a clear idea of what your next step can be. If you’re unsure of what action you can take as an individual to move our country to true Reconciliation, you’re in the right place. If you want to take action and show others how easy it is to get started in the work and the (un)learning of Reconciliation, you’re in the right place. If you want Canada to be a safer, more prosperous, and more understanding country, you’re in the right place.

Help your students enter the largest and most recognized art & creative writing competition in Canada for Indigenous youth.






CULTURE

To get you started...

The Indigenous Music Development Program (IMDP) at Manitoba Music was launched in 2004 to support First Nation, Métis, and Inuit artists and music companies as they build sustainable careers in Manitoba’s music industry.

-Background & History; SONG KEEPERS podcast and links.

Sacred Fire Productions is an Indigenous non-profit organization that produces and presents events for Indigenous artists.

The National Gallery of Canada’s Collection of Indigenous Art includes First Nations, Métis, and Inuit artworks, with an emphasis on contemporary art from 1980 to the present day.

In taking inspiration from the Haudenosaunee Seventh Generation Principle, the Indigenous Arts Collective of Canada was founded in 2012 to preserve and revitalize endangered Indigenous art forms and enrich lives through Indigenous arts and culture.

LISTEN - LEARN - DO BETTER